Casahana Mooncakes

September 1, 2013 at 8:58 pm (Chinese, Dessert)

Every year, I look forward to the Lunar Mid-Autumn Festival and the delicious mooncakes that are the traditional delicacy for this celebration.  There are several variations of this pastry unique to the different regions of China but the most widely recognised would have to be the Cantonese variety, comprising a thin, chewy, reddish-brown crust encasing a rich lotus seed paste and salted duck egg yolks.  Its hard to beat Mei-Xin’s traditional mooncakes for the amazingly smooth paste, creamy yolks and expertly thin crust, but there’s something to be said for some of the more modern interpretations, which incorporate exotic flavours, omochi ‘crusts’ and some even made with jelly; possibly somewhat more accessible for those who are turned off by the idea of finding a salted egg in a cake…

Casahana is a Malaysian confectionery and pastry company that produces halal mooncakes with a wide range of interesting flavour combinations, making use of ingredients commonly featured in Asian-style sweets – azuki, taro, green tea, pumpkin, yam and pandan – and pairing them with the not-so-standard; honey, pomegranate, stonefruit, and rose-water, with even ginseng making an appearance in a luxurious Empress Magic mooncake.  Savoury components are used to enhance sweetness in some varieties, including an exotic Fiery Phoenix mooncake that matches spicy chicken floss and red bean paste in an omochi skin.

Casahana Mooncakes

The jet black Night Symphony would have to be one of the most striking, featuring a charcoal pastry surrounding matcha flavoured lotus seed paste and molten white chocolate.

Casahana - Night Symphony

Casahana - Night Symphony v2

If you’re a fan of brownies (let’s be honest, who isn’t?), German Black Forest is sure to appeal; a decadent double chocolate paste filled with blackcurrants and chocolate chips, surrounding a glace cherry centre and encased in chocolate pastry.  The addition of chocolate to lotus seed paste creates a texture that is not unlike that of ganache, rich, smooth and dense but not quite as heavy.

Casahana - Black Forest

Casahana - Black Forest v2

For the coffee aficionado, Espresso Chestnut compliments a coffee scented lotus seed paste with a light, creamy chestnut centre.  The filling is intensely flavoured but without completely masking the underlying lotus seed base; an interesting combination that is very appealing and quite addictive…

Casahana - Espresso Chestnut

Casahana - Espresso Chestnut v2

Green tea and apricot are surprisingly perfectly suited in a brilliant green creation; the faint tartness of the apricot filling is an interesting match for the hint of bitter matcha in the lotus seed paste, with a dried apricot centre for a hit of sweetness.

Casahana - Green Tea Apricot

Casahana - Green Tea Apricot v2

They’ve also nailed the basics; silky smooth fillings that are not too sweet, too dry or overly oily, and thin, textural crusts, complete with beautiful detailing.  Not quite as well done as Mei-Xin’s glossy, golden brown pastries but Casahana definitely gets added points for creativity and modernising the mooncake.

Whether or not you’re a fan of the standard lotus seed/egg yolk mooncakes, Casahana’s unique pastries should be on your list to try this coming Mid-Autumn.

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2 Comments

  1. Jo Prior said,

    OH, they sound gorgeous, I wonder if we can get kay to bake some? Looking forward to our Tonka dinner – Kay is over the moon she is included! Have a great week. Cheers Jo

    On Sun, Sep 1, 2013 at 8:58 PM, egg tarts and apple pie wrote:

    > ** > egg tarts and apple pie posted: “Every year, I look forward to the > Lunar Mid-Autumn Festival and the delicious mooncakes that are the > traditional delicacy for this celebration. There are several variations of > this pastry unique to the different regions of China but the most widely > recog”

    • egg tarts and apple pie said,

      Excellent that Kay is coming along to Tonka 🙂 I have a recipe for the traditional mooncakes if she is keen to give it a go- we’ll just have to find a mould from somewhere to get the detailing on the top.

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